Africa Essay Prize

africa essay prize 

About the Africa Essay Prize

The Slaughter and May Africa Essay Prize is an exciting opportunity for law and non-law students to demonstrate their commercial and legal skills in an African context and have the chance to win a substantial prize.

Applicants are asked to submit a response to one of the following two questions:

  • Do African countries benefit from the International Criminal Court?

    Or

  • During Theresa May’s first trip to the continent as prime minister, May said “But I am also unashamed about the need to ensure that our aid programme works for the UK. So today I am committing that our development spending will not only combat extreme poverty, but at the same time tackle global challenges and support our own national interest.” Is it legitimate for the UK to tie development spending to its national interest?  
 

 

Africa is an increasingly important part of Slaughter and May’s practice. Many of the firm’s clients have operations in African jurisdictions and it is frequently necessary for the firm to find solutions to challenging legal issues in Africa, in collaboration with outstanding local law firms across the continent.  Slaughter and May also provides advice to various African governments.

In light of this, the Slaughter and May Africa Essay Prize is intended to stimulate debate among university students around the important issues to which African commerce and law give rise.

The Slaughter and May Essay Prize joins the firm’s other Africa initiatives, including various training and secondment programmes. For more information, please see the Slaughter and May Africa site and the Trainee Recruitment site.

The rules of the competition are set out below.

To enter, you must be enrolled as a current student at an educational institution on the deadline for submission of entries. Both full-time and part-time, law and non-law, undergraduate and post-graduate students (including Graduate Diploma in Law and Legal Practice Course students) are eligible to enter.

Applicants are asked to submit a response to one of the following two questions:

  • Do African countries benefit from the International Criminal Court?

    Or

  • During Theresa May’s first trip to the continent as prime minister, May said “But I am also unashamed about the need to ensure that our aid programme works for the UK. So today I am committing that our development spending will not only combat extreme poverty, but at the same time tackle global challenges and support our own national interest.” Is it legitimate for the UK to tie development spending to its national interest?  

The word limit for your essay is 1,000 words.

Entries should display:

  • Familiarity with and interest in African commerce and law.
  • Imagination and originality in approach
  • Concision, in order to maximise the use of the available word limit.
  • Close attention to detail and an evidence-based approach.

You are free to focus on particular case studies or one or more of African jurisdictions in your essay.

A panel of Slaughter and May partners and guests will judge the competition. The winners will receive the following prizes:

First prize:            £2,000 and work placement at Slaughter and May*
Second prize: £1,000
Third prize: £500
   

*The first prize-winner will also have the opportunity to take part in a work placement at Slaughter and May. To qualify for the work placement you will be required to demonstrate that you have the right to work in the UK. Individuals who cannot provide evidence of their right to work in the UK will only be eligible for the monetary prize.

The deadline for entries is Friday 11 January 2019.

To enter the competition please click HERE to complete the form and upload your essay submission. Alternatively, you may submit your essay in hard copy then please print out the application form and send the completed form and your essay (typed or handwritten) to Saba Ismail, Slaughter and May, One Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8YY.

Note: Please do not include any personal details anywhere in your essay submission (such as your name or place of study). The essays will be judged “blind” and then matched up subsequently to the personal information you will be asked to provide when you enter via our website.

 

Slaughter and May has the right to publish or reproduce at any time all or part of any essay entered.  Slaughter and May reserve the right to delete or omit from any published article anything that in their absolute discretion should not be published on editorial or legal grounds.

Please note the footnotes are not included in the 1,000 word essay.

The essay must be the sole creation and original work of the entrant.

Only one entry per person is allowed.

Please email AfricaEssayPrize@slaughterandmay.com if you have questions about the competition.

Good luck!